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4 Comments

  1. 1

    Fiona

    Thank you, this looks like a really good resource.

    Reply
  2. 2
    Jennifer Doggett

    Jennifer Doggett

    This is a fantastic resource – great that it is now available electronically. I think Chapters 4 and 6 should be compulsory reading for all journalists (and in fact anyone working on health issues) they explain key statistical issues so clearly and made me realise that these concepts are not intrinsically difficult – it’s just that academic text books can make them seem inaccessible to lay people. How fantastic would it be if every journalist writing on health understood the difference between ‘smoking causes a 20% increase in the incidence of breast cancer in women’ and ‘20% of women who smoke get breast cancer’? In fact, instead of spending thousands of dollars sending bureaucrats on ‘teambuilding’ and ‘strategic management’ courses, the health dept would be much better off giving all employees a copy of this book and a week off to read it.

    Reply
  3. 3
    Croakey

    Croakey

    Thanks Fiona and Jennifer. Meanwhile, I’ve just been referred to this “honourable mention” from the Financial Times health and science blog. http://blogs.ft.com/healthblog/2010/03/09/a-smart-book-about-health-choices/

    Reply
  4. 4

    Nic Lucas

    Hey, just thought I’d let people know that the book is now also available as a free download at http://sensiblehealthadvice.org

    Reply

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