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  1. 1

    shepherdmarilyn

    All of this is in the pretext of processing.

    This is what DIAC told the senate in estimates about what that entails.

    QUESTION TAKEN ON NOTICE
    SUPPLEMENTARY BUDGET ESTIMATES HEARING: 19 OCTOBER 2010
    IMMIGRATION AND CITIZENSHIP PORTFOLIO
    (175) Internal Product: Refugee, Borders and Onshore Services Division
    Senator Cash asked:
    Please provide an assessment of the resources required by the department to
    process the application of an offshore humanitarian applicant compared to those for
    an Irregular Maritime Arrival (IMA)
    Answer:
    The processes required for the department to process offshore humanitarian
    applicants compared to irregular maritime arrivals are significantly different. Each is
    briefly described below with the applicable minutes allocated through the
    department’s internal funding model.
    Offshore special humanitarian program entrants are proposed by eligible onshore
    residents who lodge an application onshore, which is then assessed and either
    referred to the relevant offshore post or refused. Referred applicants are interviewed
    and, if successful, health and security clearances are completed prior to applicants
    being settled in Australia. The relevant average funded work effort for each stage is
    listed below:
    • assess and refer – 212 minutes per case
    • offshore processing including interview – 5020 minutes per case
    Irregular Maritime Arrivals (IMAs) are entry interviewed on arrival at Christmas Island,
    allocated an Immigration Advice and Assistance Scheme (IAAAS) provider, asked to
    lodge a statement of claims, interviewed during a Refugee Status Assessment (RSA)
    and, if found to be a refugee, asked to lodge an application which is processed
    before the client is settled. The indicative and estimated funded work effort/costs for
    each stage are listed below:
    • entry interview – 200 minutes per case
    • IAAAS provider – 180 minutes per case
    • RSA process – 926 minutes’ per case (based on the onshore protection
    equivalent process)’

    So, an interview, an application form and a check of details.

    They use minutes because it sounds more impressive to say 1126 minutes in 6 months or so than 18 hours.

    It’s a frigging application form. That DIAC and the government can continue to claim it is more than that is down to lazy, trashy and racist media whining about policy instead of law, never demanding a single answer from ministers and actively supporting breaking the law.

    I have just read a book detailing the racism that infuses all sectors, all the way to a high court where not one judge could find one good reason not to lock up children for life, only 2 didn’t believe the birth canal was a “migration route” for babies born in detention, 4 believed it is OK to lock up innocent people for the terms of their natural lives without ever charging them or without any sort of habeas corpus right to appeal that detention.

    And for what? A fucking visa, a stamp, a small permission slip to stay.

    Something they don’t even need.

    Reply
  2. 2

    Jo_Rans

    The world is always going to have wars, famines, dictatorships and natural disasters, which means there will always be people seeking asylum for a better future for themselves and their families.
    In Australia this year we have seen the Government and Opposition fight over what they think is the ‘best’ way to deal with aslyum seekers coming into Australia via boats. The Australian Labour Party suggested a deal with Malaysia, who is still not a signatory to the United Nations Convention relating to the Status of Refugees (1951), this was decided to be illegal in regards to international and nation law by the High Court of Australia. The Liberal Party would like to reopen Nauru and to keep offshore processing.
    Isn’t about time, considering that Australia was colonised by ‘boat people’ and has had an influx of ‘boat people’ throughout history, that the Government realises that asylum seekers are some of the most fragile and helpless people. We need to stop sending them to detention centres with barbed wire fences and put them into community based living experience which respects the human rights of those seeking aslyum in our country.

    Reply

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