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2 Comments

  1. 1

    JamesH

    While I personally support this course of action, the research showing that changes in inequality rarely have dramatic or even significant consequences on health needs to be taken into account. Cf Andrew Leigh’s comments and paper here: http://economics.com.au/?p=4810
    I am more inclined to believe that the “softer” social consequences of reduced inequality (reduced crime, stress, greater social cohesion and harmony, etc) and reducing inequality as an inherent good make inequality worth reducing even if it doesn’t show up in life expectancy changes.

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