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7 Comments

  1. 1

    simon.chapman

    Just been advised that the “hooked” poster above ran 5 yrs ago, but the “Don’t go cold turkey” is current. Plus ca change?

    Reply
  2. 2

    LJG..............

    Would you call Champix a Nicotine Replacement Therapy? I’d classify it more as a cold turkey aid as it enables the user to continue the behaviour without the effects of the actual drug nicotine. I used it over two years ago for my first (successful) attempt at quitting. But i’d agree that the motives for quitting any drug are more important to success than anything else – and if anybody could work out away to definitively motivate people they would really be on a winner.

    Reply
  3. 3

    Steinberg Mike

    I would invite readers to actually read the entire ATTUD Statement:
    http://www.attud.org
    Thank you.

    Reply
  4. 4

    simon.chapman

    Mike, I read it. And …?

    Reply
  5. 5

    jones elliot

    I find it strange that health professionals and academics alike don’t seem to understand the psychological and physical addiction to nicotine and smoking. Whilst the NHS continue to push Nicotine Replacement Therapy [NRT] on unsuspecting patients I look on in dread. Of course you go to the doctor and s/he refers you to the smoking cessation nurse or a smoking cessation treatment centre and hey presto you’re on NRT, whether it be Nicorette, Nicotinell, NiQuitin CQ, or Champix/Zyban. With regards to NRT, isn’t it blazingly obvious that giving someone nicotine to stop their nicotine addiction just doesn’t make sense? Why aren’t the alarm bells going off throughout the NHS cancer wards and treatment centres? Why doesn’t the patient question this? Well, there are only two choices when you enter a NHS clinic for smoking cessation: Campix/Zyban or NRT. So either take a risk that you don’t commit suicide [we’ve all heard the stories] on Campix/Zyban or go on a course of NRT. For some NRT is the lesser of two evils. The trouble is that choosing the patches, gum inhalers and lozenges to get your nicotine fix just keeps you addicted; NRT keeps you hooked to nicotine and increases your chance of relapsing into smoking once more. This is why NRT only has a 6% success rate.
    One of the main reasons for this is NRT provides the nicotine but without the rush. It’s like sex without the orgasm. Eventually you want the rush, you want the real thing and you start to smoke again, and that’s why patches, and gum and all the other NRT products very rarely work in the long term. I use the mygismo method. It’s healthy and it worked for me. Enough said?

    Reply
  6. 6

    LJG..............

    Jones – You’ve got a point about psychological and physical addiction but what’s so great about mygismo? – the website says very little except “buy the book!” and a free app which is only suitable for those who have an android compatible smartphone. Really it only looks like a variation of cold turkey – there are a million books out there that promise to help people quit smoking – what makes this one any better? Where are the scientific studies that prove mygismo works.
    Again – I think the individuals motivation at the time is the most important factor and probably pushing up the price of cigarettes to the levels they have has probably been the most important factor – although I hate seeing homeless people going through the butts at rubbish bins.

    Reply
  7. 7

    Cameron

    People get way too hung up on things like NRT vs Cold Turkey vs Meds.
    I agree that organisations should do there best to maintain a universal approach. However, I also think users can simply “keep looking” if they don’t like what they are given.

    I bet big tobacco execs LOL every time they see members of the quit smoking community, have at each other over what the best way to quit is.

    Every method fails and every method succeeds. Millions have quit Cold Turkey, millions have quit with NRT and millions have quit with Prescribed Meds.

    With so many methods available, it is no wonder that ex smokers now outnumber smokers in many countries.

    http://www.achoice2live.com/ex-smokers-now-out-number-smokers-in-us-uk-and-australia/

    Nicotine addiction is a chronic brain disease and needs to be treated as a disease. This means providing education, support, planning, consultation and sometimes medical assistance.

    Reply

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